At the back of the hill

Warning: If you stay here long enough you will gain weight! Grazing here strongly suggests that you are either omnivorous, or a glutton. And you might like cheese-doodles.
BTW: I'm presently searching for another person who likes cheese-doodles.
Please form a caseophilic line to the right. Thank you.

Monday, February 06, 2012

HONG KONG POSTING

One of my readers (S.B.) writes:
"I find myself in HK this month. Visited a Davidoff store in search of pipe tobacco. A tin of Royalty was a mere $358hkd. Uh, no thanks. Even more expensive than Canada where a tin runs for $30cad.
Thank goodness I packed a tin of Chelsea Morning before the flight here. Not my favourite blend but it tastes better knowing that I only spent $10 on it.
I did buy some cigarillos. Expensive at $194hkd for 10 Davidoff clubs but does well for a quick fix.
Off to enjoy the rest of HK. I'll search your archives on food later. I think I have a cha chang teng meal in my near future.
"
End quote.


EAT - DRINK - SMOKE


Readers in the United States should know that Royalty by Davidoff is an internationally available pipe tobacco that is smokeable in a pinch. Some people really like it, and while it is by no means a favourite of this blogger, I do have several tins stashed away to enjoy after the Zombie Apocalypse, along with all my other tobaccos.

Still, fifty bucks US for a tin of pipe tobacco is ridiculous. So is thirty dollars Canadian, but I understand they have to subsidize otters and polar bears, and those furry freeloaders are quite expensive.
What with their well-known laziness and all that.
Cute and loveable costs extra.

Here in California we think we're being royally screwed by the state government in Sacramento, who have yanked up the price of tobacco products to the point where homeless and unemployed people have to mug schoolkids for their lunch money or whack some old biddy over the head with a beer bottle for her pension cheque, just so that they can purchase a pack of smokes.

We often forget that elsewhere in this world the wheat-germ freaks and do-gooders have got their greasy claws more firmly around the scrotal sacks of our fellow tobacco mavens.

Which explains why the Zombie Apocalypse is inevitable.

It will be a needed cleansing of the earth.

No more damned puritans.

But I digress.


Anyhow, for the convenience of temporary visitors to Hong Kong, such as the writer of the message quoted above, here are links to previous articles on this blog about food in Fragrant Harbour.


IN MONG KOK, SNACK WITH YOUR FAT SISTER!
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/10/in-mong-kok-snack-with-your-fat-sister.html
All about eating stuff on a stick.


HONG KONG ROAST GOOSE IN SHAM TSENG
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/10/hong-kong-roast-goose-in-sham-tseng.html
The what and why of a delicious bird.


KWUN TONG - HONG KONG'S CHANGING ORIGINAL SUBURB, PLUS A RESTAURANT
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/08/kwun-tong-hong-kongs-changing-original.html
A brief description of an industrial area of Hong Kong which is being transformed, ending with a fond description of the Shanghai Wing Wah Szechuan Restaurant (上海榮華川菜館), plus over a dozen recommended dishes there.
As well as a gratuitous mention of the Tsim Chai Kee Noodle Restaurant (沾仔記) in Central (中環), which does stellar shrimp wonton.


TAI PO MARKET 大埔
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/04/tai-po-market.html
Description of the town, and spot reviews of several local restaurants there. Plus recommendations.
Anyway, look for Hakka cuisine.


WIFE CAKE - PILGRIMAGE TO YUEN LONG
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/04/wife-cake-pilgrimage-to-yuen-long.html
There are TWO reasons to go to Yuen Long (元朗) in the New Territories. One of them is poon choi (盤菜), the other one is wife cake.


FLOWER MARKET ROAD IN MONGKOK: 旺角花墟道
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/03/flower-market-road-in-mongkok.html
Kaidanchai at Uncle Fong's, the Saint Honoré Cake Shop (聖安娜餅屋) at the corner of Flower Market and Yuen Ngai, Cheesecake at the Supreme (貴族蛋糕, 160A Prince Edward Road West), and 七喜粥麵小廚 (chat hei jook mien siu tsyu) on Fa Yuen Street(花園街) for fishballs, rice porridge, and small eats.


FISHY INTERLUDE - TUNG CHOI STREET, HONG KONG
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/03/fishy-interlude-tung-choi-street-hong.html
Aquarium stores, a book seller, and three restaurants to eat lunch.


IT'S JUST PAST THE SEVEN ELEVEN, YOU CAN'T MISS IT!
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/03/its-just-past-seven-eleven-you-cant.html
Random speculation about the lunch habits of our Hong Kong office, as well as three lovely eateries within walking distance of Mody Road (麼地道), on Hau Fook Street (厚福街), right in the centre of TsimShaTsui (尖沙咀).


WONTON, WANTAN, WUNTUN: HON'S WUN TUN HOUSE AND SCRAWNY MAK
http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/2011/01/wonton-wantan-wuntun-hons-wun-tun-house.html
After discussing Hon's Wun-Tun House on Kearny Street in San Francisco, the great mack-daddy of all Cantonese wuntuneries is detailed.


* * * * * *


Of course, Hong Kong is totally dimsum central. And everyone you speak to will have their own favourite cha tsan teng, than which there is no better, which they will insist on explaining in a manner that bears no contradiction, and at great inordinate length.
Unless they're willing to go there with you, however, take their opinion as advice rather than the gospel.


For everything I've ever written about Hong Kong, click this label: 香港.
There's rather a lot, and it's not all about food. Some of it is more or less gibberish.


Have a great time, eat well, and don't run out of pipe tobacco.



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