At the back of the hill

Warning: If you stay here long enough you will gain weight! Grazing here strongly suggests that you are either omnivorous, or a glutton. And you might like cheese-doodles.
BTW: I'm presently searching for another person who likes cheese-doodles.
Please form a caseophilic line to the right. Thank you.

Sunday, December 19, 2010

ROTTEN CHEESE

Over the weekend, some Dutchman cruised into my blog and saw a post from quite a while back. He was quite peeved at what he read, and reacted accordingly. As many Dutch computer users are not very internet savvy he may not have noticed that I have written other things about the Dutch.

Unpleasant things.

As suits an unpleasant bunch of people.

So for the benefit of him and his kind, should he (and they) ever come back here, I would like put the spotlight on what is probably the most useful (though certainly not the most common) clickable LABEL on this blog:


Rottekaas

[The term Rottekaas means 'rotten cheese' - the Dutch are "Kaaskoppen" ('cheese heads') according to the Belgians, and were "Jan Kaes" ('John Cheese') to the English on the Eastern Seaboard. Jan Kaes eventually became 'Yankee' - the plural-seeming 's' termination was dropped once the word was Anglified.]

In the rubrique 'Rottekaas' you will find all my bile and venom towards the nation where I once lived, her repulsive natives, and their impact on the world. Personally I think it makes for some very enjoyable reading indeed.
I have not yet created a clickable label for my love and respect for that nation, or her pleasant non-repulsive natives. That's an oversight. Oh well.


Lastly, for any Rottekaas that visit this blog and are unaware of how they may go about finding out more about this blogger and his objectionable opinions, you should know that you are NOT at the most recent set of posts unless you see http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/ in your address bar.
You probably came here as the result of a search. And if you are Dutch, the good lord only knows what kind of vile perversion you were looking for on the internet -- perhaps sex with horses or Turkish orphan rape, possibly anal-absorption of party drugs and illegal stimulants, maybe even rubber bycicle chains and adjustable wrenches used for auto-erotic purposes -- so the post that upset you quite likely will not be au courant. Just delete everything in your title bar till it looks like http://atthebackofthehill.blogspot.com/.


There are over sixteen hundred posts. Maybe you'll find something here that you like.
Or something that will make you apoplectic.
Gam zu le tova.

Enjoy your visit, feel free to comment.
Thank you for stopping by.



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1 Comments:

  • At 3:30 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    Well,theres "rotten cheese"and then theres REALLY "rotten cheese" such as "Casu marzu" (also called casu modde, casu cundhĂ­du in Sardinian dialects, or in Italian formaggio marcio) is a traditional Sardinian sheep milk cheese, notable for being riddled with live insect larvae. It is found mainly in Sardinia, Italy.

    Derived from Pecorino, casu marzu goes beyond typical fermentation to a stage most would consider decomposition, brought about by the digestive action of the larvae of the cheese fly Piophila casei. These larvae are deliberately introduced to the cheese, promoting an advanced level of fermentation and breaking down of the cheese's fats. The texture of the cheese becomes very soft, with some liquid (called lagrima, from the Sardinian for "tears") seeping out. The larvae themselves appear as translucent white worms, about 8 millimetres (0.3 in) long.[1] When disturbed, the larvae can launch themselves for distances up to 15 centimetres (6 in). Some people clear the larvae from the cheese before consuming; others do not."
    Come on now, how could anyone resist cheese with flying attack maggots?

     

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